What does Boclean Catch -- Trojans or "Malware"?

Years ago there was a separate category of anti-trojan programs (e.g., BoClean). Now the buzzword is “malware.” So, the following question:

On the Comodo site describing BOC it states that BOC protects from 270,000 unique malware programs. However, when I open the “covered malware” tab on BOC, it lists about 27,000! Moreover, it sometimes says Trojan rather than malware. Is this just a name change? How many signatures does BOC really have? My latest update states:

“25604 trojans are covered in your current BOC423.XVU file:”

Confused in Illinois.

I’m also curious, as BOClean detects “well over a million” malware, according to its website. How is this possible? Are there many variants of the trojans covered in BOC423.XVU, but they are all detected?

Welcome to the bleeding edge. ;D
In regard to the question on how BOC counts what is covered you may want to read through the explanation here.
http://www.comodo.com/boclean/trolist.html

Trojan or malware? It’s hard to say when speaking in general terms.
The terms used to describe the various exploits have morphed in the last few years as the techniques, vectors of attack and payload changed.
A few years back we would see a virus, trojan or worm usually with one specific purpose, today they dump everything including the kitchen sink.
For instance, malicious adware installed through a browser hijack will usually include several different components other than the “adware” that may pump pop ups or install a toolbar. It may drop a spam bot and keylogger as well as a classic trojan for remote access. For simplicity’s sake we call it malware though it may include several different components.

Here’s an article by Mike: https://forums.comodo.com/index.php/topic,3018.0.html

Malware is a collective term that includes trojans and other known nasties. I use it as well to be “safe” (pun not intended).

Actually, a malware for remote access would be something else, like a backdoor.

The words virus, trojan and worm describe the means of spreading.

A backdoor is an example of a payload. Viruses, trojans and worms can carry a backdoor.

I think the terminology in the AV business is confused enough already, no need to make it worse.