IPV6

Was wondering if Dragon still has IPV4 rule as its guide or if IPV6 is already installed or will be (within the next 2 updates ?).
Especially since IPV4 is incorporated into the new IP addresses and rules of IPV6.

Also the same question applies to Comodo Secure DNS and any other product of Comodo that is involved in any way with IP addresses ? 88)

UncleDoug

Thought a Hexadecimal Numbering System could have worked ?

IPv6 is a function of the operating system, so if the OS you’re using has support, CD will use it. Assuming you have a valid, routeable Ipv6 address.

Especially since IPV4 is incorporated into the new IP addresses and rules of IPV6.

Ipv4 and Ipv6 are two completely different and incompatible protocol stacks. Perhaps you’re referring to Ipv6 tunnelling, whereby Ipv6 is encapsulated in an Ipv4 frame.

Also the same question applies to [b]Comodo Secure DNS[/b] and any other product of Comodo that is involved in any way with IP addresses ? 88)

UncleDoug

Ipv6 AAAA resource records are not yet widely supported.

Thought a Hexadecimal Numbering System could have worked ?

Apologies, I don’t understand the question Ipv6 does use a hexadecimal numbering system, at least at a high level.

Sorry for the Confusion, many times I ask questions that are known by those that have researched it, but not those like me that only know enough to ask questions.

IPv6 is a function of the operating system, so if the OS you're using has support, CD will use it. Assuming you have a valid, routeable Ipv6 address.

In the near future when IPv6 is being used for New IP adresses, will XP support it?

I not want to be locked out of other future or updated Comodo Products as Secure DNS, Dragon, EasyVPN (to connect to a link/ IP Address)
I use the term Locked Out in comparison to to IE9 and XP.

Ipv6 AAAA resource records are not yet widely supported.

Since reading the last of the IPv4 addresses have been assigned, your calculated Quess-timation of when it will start to be adopted ?

I apologize for my random thoughts.

Thought a Hexadecimal Numbering System could have worked ?

Apologies, I don’t understand the question Ipv6 does use a hexadecimal numbering system, at least at a high level

Thought a Hexadecimal numbering system could have been incorporated into IPv4 to increase available IP addresses with minor modifications.
And also allow Businesses and Schools, that use programs that require UIDs (Unique ID Identifier) along with name /alias or email address, to be assigned specific blocks of UIDs from that software company.

Sorry for rambling, sometimes my thoughts slightly tie together but actually are far apart ! 88)

UncleDoug

That’s often the best way to learn.

In the near future when IPv6 is being used for New IP adresses, [u]will XP support it?[/u]

I not want to be locked out of other future or updated Comodo Products as Secure DNS, Dragon, EasyVPN (to connect to a link/ IP Address)
I use the term Locked Out in comparison to to IE9 and XP.

Windows XP has IP v6 support. For some more background you could read: http://www.windowsnetworking.com/articles_tutorials/IPv6-Support-Microsoft-Windows.html .

Since reading the last of the IPv4 addresses have been assigned, your calculated Quess-timation of when it will start to be adopted ?
That's a true $ 64,000 question. Nobody knows exactly when. My estimation is that there will be a transition time where both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses will be used. F.e. there are millions and millions of IPv4 only modems out there that won't be replaced by ISP's in the short run.

quote]I apologize for my random thoughts.
[/quote]
np

Thought a Hexadecimal numbering system could have been incorporated into IPv4 to increase available IP addresses with minor modifications. And also allow Businesses and Schools, that use programs that require UIDs (Unique ID Identifier) along with name /alias or email address, to be assigned specific blocks of UIDs from that software company.

Sorry for rambling, sometimes my thoughts slightly tie together but actually are far apart ! 88)

UncleDoug

Not something I am familiar with.

If I remember correctly, IPv6 has been included with XP since SP2, but it’s disabled by default. if you wish to enable the protocol stack, open a command prompt and type:

netsh int ipv6 install

To disable:

netsh int ipv6 uninstall

I not want to be locked out of other[i] future[/i] or [i]updated[/i] Comodo Products as Secure DNS, Dragon, EasyVPN (to connect to a link/ IP Address) I use the term Locked Out in comparison to to IE9 and XP.

By the time Ipv6 is mainstream, there shouldn’t be any worries about application compatibility. As I said, it’s part of the operating system and is installed and enabled on Vista. Windows 7 and Linux.

I believe Comodo are currently using UltraDNS for their secure DNS servers, but the recently acquired DNS.com, so I imagine there will be changes in the future.

EasyVPN will have to undergo some changes and it uses the ipv4 address block 5.0.0.0/8 which is being reallocated and thus won’t be available for that purpose.

Since reading the last of the IPv4 addresses have been assigned, your calculated Quess-timation of when it will start to be adopted ?

Although the ipv4 address space has been all but allocated, don’t expect any changes in the near future. The majority of ISPs have been procrastinating over ipv6 for years and most still are. Your best bet wou;d be to contact your ISP and ask about their plans. It’s hight likely they’ll be moving to something like Large Scale NAT or DS-lite.

I apologize for my random thoughts.

No worries.

Thought a Hexadecimal numbering system could have been incorporated into IPv4 to increase available IP addresses with minor modifications. And also allow Businesses and Schools, that use programs that require UIDs (Unique ID Identifier) along with name /alias or email address, to be assigned specific blocks of UIDs from that software company.

Sorry for rambling, sometimes my thoughts slightly tie together but actually are far apart ! 88)

UncleDoug

There was little point trying to extend the life of ipv4 as it has quite a few limitations. There were a few suggestions floating around in the early 1990s when ipv6 was first being discussed, but the in the end, it’s not just about extending the number of available addresses. Ipv6 has a lot of interesting built in functionality.

The other thing to consider, if you are behind a router - does your router support IPv6? If not, will a firmware update correct this issue? If not, at some point, you WILL need to change your router.

Thank you all for your replies and educations.

I will be reading and asking.

This topic can be closed and should be a starting reference point for others in the future.

UncleDoug