How to turn Comodo off without uninstalling?

Couple questions for anyone who may know:

  1. How can I turn Comodo completely off without uninstalling it (so
    that no Comodo processes run)?

  2. How can I prevent Comodo from starting when Windows boots?

I’ve read through the user manual, searched the user forums, and
installed Comodo on a test box, but I’ve yet to find answers to these
two questions.

Thanks,

Doid

Hi there.

I’ll try to answer this in a simple way:

  1. You can’t. You can set the firewall to “Allow All” if you want to bypass the firewall completely. But when you kill the service and it’s processes, you also compromise the IP stack and you’ll get limited internet access if at all.

  2. You can’t, or atleast not without going though major changes in the registry and reconfiguring certain services. I’d really advise against doing this for obvious reasons.

Hope this answers your questions.

Triple is right: don’t disable it unless you know exactly what you’re intending to do. If you still want to know, the easiest and safest method to prevent CFP processes from starting without registry changes is to reboot in Safe Mode or Safe Mode with Networking.

i’v used winpatrol to stop cfp from starting to install a security program i first turned off cfp then i disabled the startup in winpatrol and turned the cmdagent.exe to manual and comodo did not start on restart :slight_smile: it did not seem to hurt nothing also i was not online when i was doing it then after i was done i turned it back on in winpatrol and restarted and it all works again :slight_smile: so is it bad to do this :slight_smile:

Thanks Triplejolt and Soya, that gives me a better picture. I wasn’t
sure if there was some simple switch that could be used to disable
Comodo.

I’m asking because I’m looking around for a non-intrusive ZoneAlarm
replacement. I spend my days developing software, which means I hit
my drives hard practically continuously. ZoneAlarm slows my builds
down by about 35%, which is simply intolerable, but at least I can
turn the blasted thing off. Comodo Firewall doesn’t affect my build
times significantly at all, and looks like a great replacement in
other respects as well.

The trouble is, I don’t want to be locked into a particular family of
products. I’d like to run Comodo as my firewall, for example, but
also periodically scan for viruses with ZoneAlarm (as well as with
Comodo AntiVirus), to increase the chances of catching emerging new
viruses.

  1. You can’t. You can set the firewall to “Allow All” if you want to
    bypass the firewall completely. But when you kill the service and it’s
    processes, you also compromise the IP stack and you’ll get limited
    internet access if at all.

Sure, if the firewall process is terminated asynchronously by another,
unrelated program. I was simply curious to know if Comodo could be
instructed to terminate gracefully, without compromising anything.
Surely it has the capacity. Otherwise things could get very messy
when Windows shuts down.

  1. You can’t, or at least not without going though major changes in the
    registry and reconfiguring certain services. I’d really advise against
    doing this for obvious reasons.

Yet there are good reasons for doing it, like evaluating, developing,
and testing code without third-party processes interfering, or simply
working offline.

In general I’m not enthused about any product that effectively
commandeers my system. Of course it makes sense to bring up a desktop
firewall as early in the system boot process as possible. It’s just
that I’d like to make that choice for myself. If I can’t, then the
firewall itself becomes a sort of virus, at least temporarily. That’s
one thing I have to say ZoneAlarm gets right. You can start it and
stop it as you please, like any ordinary application. Really, it’s
too bad for Comodo. If it “played nice” with other security products
it would gain greater exposure to more potential customers. Just
because I want to use a ZoneAlarm component doesn’t mean I wouldn’t
use the comparable Comodo component.

Anyway, thanks for the info. I like what I see so far in Comodo. It
may yet end up permanently installed on my desktop.

Doid

lurkingatu2,

That’s good info too. I wasn’t familiar with WinPatrol. Thanks much.

Doid

Here’s one of the reasons why CFP wasn’t designed to be totally disabled:
firewallleaktester.com - This website is for sale! - firewallleaktester Resources and Information. ;D

cpf.exe can be prevented from loading if you set the Comodo Application Agent service to disable, but you need to reboot like lurkingatu2 stated.

cmdagent.exe is trickier because the cmdmon.sys driver from Device Managers’ hidden devices must be disabled - but this method might cause a BSOD.

Hi doid

Correct me if i am wrong please, but if u right click on the comodo icon in the task bar and selct exit, will this inturn shut off comodo firewall without uninstalling?

Novie

Novieiam: that only closes cpf.exe, not cmdagent.exe. It was built this way in the event that the GUI crashes, the driver would continue to provide inbound protection. If this wasn’t the case, every CFP user would be vulnerable to incoming connections during boot-up. Drivers always load before other files including Windows.

Also, if you intend to disable CFP with the driver still running and to test other firewalls like ZoneAlarm, they will still conflict.

When told to Exit, I believe CFP 2.4 sets the Security Level to Allow All before exiting.

Ok who’s willing to be the test rat on that one by going to a port scanning site? ;D

(:CLP)lol

Hi Kail (:WAV)

If this is so, then far b it for me to say, but my 2$ would b to say that the pop up is slightly missleading, i.e the pop up sayS that COMODO will not b protecting ur PC.

With ur comment, it should suggest that when selecting this option COMODO will select the security option to ALLOW ALL, enabling all traffic.

I am not trying to pick holes in the grammer in any way…just merley a suggestion.

Many thanks
Novie

Soya: The volunteer… should be the person who thought the test up. Obviously. ;D

Novie: Originally… way back… CFP did, when exited, silently carry on allowing, blocking by default (without any alerts). I believe Comodo decided that it was logically wrong (user perception) to leave CFP in that state when the user had manually terminated it. So, they changed it. I can’t remember if a user complained about it or not, or if Comodo just did it.

I decided i would b the lab rat…!!

pcfank test on basic TCP scanning on random 20 ports with COMODO on “exit” mode…

1325  	   	stealthed  	     	n/a  	     	n/a
1976 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
2485 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
7004 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
15557 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
16836 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
23260 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
23938 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
26989 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
30571 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a

Novieiam: (:CLP)

But is that without any firewall including a hardware one like a router? ;D

We already expected that with your name (:TNG)

Greetz, Red.

Hi all (:WAV)

Firstly thanks to red for the vote of confidence (:TNG)

Right COMODO on “exit” mode

Windows firewall off

Router firewall OFF…

results…as explained before:

Port:  	 	Status  	     	Service  	     	Description
4142 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
5990 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
7200 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
8570 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
18577 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
21030 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
24755 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
26536 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a
32135 	  	stealthed 	    	n/a 	    	n/a

Recommendation:

All the ports we have scanned are Stealthed (by a firewall). So just continue following the fundamental security measures and regularly update your security software.

As per your avatar’s sake: WOO-HOO! :BNC. That’s so (:KWL). Remember with CFP’s gui off, it’s only inbound protection, no outbound.

I am runing out of hats to eat tonight…lol