How to Remove Firewall Reg Keys?

After installing Comodo Internet Security, only the Anti-virus and NOT the Firewall, I find I have "\Comodo\Firewall Pro" keys all over my Windows Registry (XP Pro, SP3 w/ all fixes). How can I safely remove these keys? If I do that manually, will it affect the Comodo Anti-virus feature?
TIA

Welcome. :slight_smile:

The CIS installer installs the whole security suite but only activates what you choose upon installation (this is so you can add/remove components in the future without reinstalling). Deleting any keys from CIS can possibly cause a corrupt installation and problems in the future (especially with program updates). I highly recommend leaving all CIS keys alone.

If you are worried about registry size try defragging it with http://www.regdefrag.com/

I defrag every day, but that won’t remove the hundreds of Registry keys related to Comodo Firewall that I don’t use or need and are modified every time I install some program. This certainly appears to be poor design/programming on Comodo’s part.

a registry defragger is different than a normal defragger, just a FIY

The keys you are referring to are the actual Firewall and D+ rules. Settings stored in the registry can be accessed faster than when stored in .ini files. So I wouldn’t call that a design flaw.

It has been tested and it turns out that a big registry doesn’t slow down Windows. The only thing that slows down Windows are certain obsolete keys during start up that have Windows waiting. Removing them is the main reason as far as I understand this topic to clean the registry.

COMODO didn’t just add random registry keys to bloat your registry. As I explained, CIS was developed this way for usability reasons, so users can add/remove components of CIS without reinstalling.

Thank you, Moderator, for your help. It remains my contention that including hundreds of Registry keys, that are accessed and updated every time I install any other program, in order to help those few who may wish to change their Comodo software configuration is poor design. Although I will continue to miss BOClean, I find it prudent (for me) to do without Comodo Internet Security. If you ever go back to a pure Anti-virus/BOClean stand-alone product, I will be sure to investigate it.
Thanks, again,
Bill