HACKERS BEWARE!!!!

THERE IS A HACKER TRYING HIS HARDEST TO GAIN ACCESS TO MY PC FOR THE PAST 3 MONTHS.
HE HAS A PROGRAM SETUP AS SOON AS I CONNECT TO THE INTERNET. THE PROCESS STARTS
AND THIS HACKER WILL TRY ANYTHING TO GAIN ACCESS! BEWARE!

HACKER YOU WILL NOT SUCCEED!!..

Why don’t you change your ip address (disconnect your router for a full day and plug it back in should give you a new ip address
while your at it, change your machine id

a simple example of changing the name
Make sure your in admin mode —>go to run —> type in cmd
netsh p2p pnrp peer set machine name=“”
netsh p2p pnrp peer set machine publish=stop
netsh p2p pnrp peer set machine publish=start

Close Admin out being in admin mode and the cmd window.

and feel free to change your computer name.
click “my computer” then right click “properties”, click on “computer name”

Google for more info before doing any of this. <–but this is the basic principle of it (there’s more then 1 way of doing anything

This should ■■■■ off your hacker even more, this won’t help if your hacker is on the same local network as you :slight_smile: (in it’s simplest terms)

How do you know this? Is it just because you’re getting port-scanned a lot or something?

And your point in posting it here was… what, exactly?

As for changing your IP address and machine name… that’s good advice, I suppose… that is, if what you claim is happening really is what’s happening. But IP addresses are randomly scanned by all sorts of hackers all the time. It doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the same hacker always doing it. Changing your IP won’t really matter because the people who are port scanning are doing it in IP number order… just moving through lists of IP addresses, hoping they’ll finally be able to get into one, by luck. If that’s the case with you, then changing it will do nothing other than, perhaps, get a particular hacker port scanner off your back at that particular moment… but he’ll just be almost immediately replaced by another… and another… and… well… I think you get the point.

Now, if you change your IP and the break-in attempts from the very same IP address immediately (and the operative word, here, is “immediately”) resume, even though you’re using an entirely new IP…

…well, then, that might mean that you’re already infected; and that whatever’s infected you is phoning home with your IP address and telling the hacker where to find you even after you’ve changed it. In other words, an outbound port through your firewall is open to the infection for home-phoning purposes; but the responding hacker can’t talk back because the firewall is preventing his incoming response.

That’s at least half good; but what you really need to do is both find the infection, and then get it the heck off your system! Now.

Even Comodo’s anti-virus won’t find it if it’s something which doesn’t happen to be in its anti-virus database. If that’s the case, then you should try to use something like SuperAntiSpyware and/or Malware Bytes to hunt it down and rid yourself of it.

Whenever the infection first tried to phone home, either or both of the firewall and/or the “Defense+” parts of Commodo Internet Security should have alerted you… that is, unless you had them in “training” mode or something. Or, if you were alerted, you may have accidentally once allowed the exploit’s initial outbound home-phoning communication… probably, as has happened to many of us at least once, because you, at the time, were either in a hurry, or you were sick-to-death of all the pop-ups and just clicked on it thinking that it was something else that you thought was okay. One must be careful about such things.

In any case, it’s all probably something different than you think it is. Dig deeper.

Good luck.