Configuring firewall (can't get Vista laptop and XP desktop to communicate)

Good day,

I have a problem. I typed out a huge long post about this problem, then clicked preview. It looked as if the picture in my post had been resized a bit. I right clicked it, and selected “View Image”. Sure enough, the original picture was in its full form. A pointless escapade, but one which would cost me dear… I clicked back, and my post was gone. Ouch. So here I am - the fool - typing out my post once again. My patience is being tested… Oh well.

Maybe that broke the ice a little. :smiley:

I have two problems, really. My first is that I can’t get my Vista laptop to communicate with my XP desktop without turning off Comodo Firewall. My second problem is that I’m having difficulty finding good help articles on how to solve my first problem. I need help.

Here’s a little schematic of my proposed network:

It seems that Vista and XP have totally different languages that I find difficulty in translating. All I really know is that XP doesn’t have LLTD installed from the off. I have applied the patch thing to XP… So now what do I do?

I don’t usually like to do this - I’d prefer to work it out for myself. However, my only solution is to turn off one of the computer’s firewalls. Not ideal. So I’m now asking for your help. Please assist me!

Thank you very much.

bump

Welcome to the forum, Kryters

Thank you for the picture. That helps to understand things a lot.

I’m presuming that the laptop and the desktop can each talk to the Linksys, so there isn’t a networking problem. Wireless networking problems can sometime mask problems so it looks like a firewall problem.

Which machine is it that is running CFP? I’m presuming the XP desktop, but that’s just me making a guess.

In CFP, which network zones are defined, and what IP addresses are in those zones? The typical configuration problem is that one or the other machine has an IP address outside the zone the firewall recognizes as being on the LAN. The other typical problem, is that the zone doesn’t include the x.x.x.255 broadcast address, which invariably messes up shares and printing although everything else seems to work.

In CFP, which network zones are defined, and what IP addresses are in those zones? The typical configuration problem is that one or the other machine has an IP address outside the zone the firewall recognizes as being on the LAN. The other typical problem, is that the zone doesn’t include the x.x.x.255 broadcast address, which invariably messes up shares and printing although everything else seems to work.
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Thanks for your response.

Okay, it definitely seems to be a firewall issue. Both machines are running CFP, actually. When I deactivate the firewall on one machine, all communications are available. When they are both active, nothing gets through. Would I be right in saying that it’s just a case of defining the network zones correctly?

I’ve already given defining some network zones a go. However, this is process is definitely what I find most intimidating about the process, especially when I see things like this in the tutorials:

I’d be really grateful if you could tell me how to do this properly, or point me in the direction of a tutorial simple enough for me to understand.

Thanks a lot for your help.

Alrighty, not a problem.

In CFP, click Firewall, and in the right hand column you’ll see “My Network Zones”. Click that, and you’ll see what network zones are defined in CFP on that machine. You’ll likely have one or two entries present. The entries must be the same in CFP on both of your machines.

On my machine, for example, there are two entries.

The “Loopback” zone, as defined as In[127.0.0.0 / 255.0.0.0] The “/” says this is a network mask definition. It’s actually the easiest way to define a really large range of addresses. In this instance, it says the address range is from 127.0.0.0 all the way up to 127.255.255.255.

The “My LAN” zone, I have defined as In[192.168.0.1 - 192.168.0.250]. The "-’ says this is an explicit range. Only the addresses in that range are recognized. Not the 192.168.0.0 or the 192.168.0.251 thru x.255.

If I wanted “My LAN” to include all the addresses, I could define it as a mask In[192.168.0.0 / 255.255.255.0].

I’m suspecting that your network zones are defined as a range, going from x.1 to x.254. LAN networking, just by the way that it was designed to work, uses x.255 as a way for one machine to broadcast to all the other machines as a group. If that x.255 address isn’t in your zone definition, then that broadcast can’t be heard, and so the machines don’t know about each other. That’s sounds a lot like what you’re describing.

My dayjob includes network administration. I get caught up in the terminology sometimes, and it can get confusing when I try to describe things. Sorry about that…